Navigate / search

Invasive Plant Removal

Earlier this fall, Morgan Community Mile Director Ellis Brown, along with several Morgan students and community members, participated in an invasive plant removal in the stream valleys of the Chinquapin Run and Herring Run. Much of the stream valleys is overrun with English ivy, an invasive plant that grows both on the ground and on trees, and kills trees by blocking light from reaching their leaves. The added weight of the vines makes the trees more likely to fall, creating a hazard. Invasive plant removal is a key factor in watershed restoration, as it allows the native plants to thrive.

Fallen trees weakened by English ivy.
Fallen trees weakened by English ivy.
English ivy on a living tree.
English ivy on a living tree.

The volunteers attacked the English ivy near the roots of the vines, clipping them near the ground and then removing as much of the ivy as possible from the trees’ trunks. Vines that had climbed out of reach would die without their connection to their roots, and as they withered, the trees’ leaves would once again be exposed to crucial sunlight.

IMAG0541(1)

Students hard at work, removing English ivy.
Students hard at work, removing English ivy.

The volunteers cleared ivy from many trees, but much work remains to be done. In addition to English ivy, invasive plants including kudzu and porcelainberry have also taken over trees and ground cover in the Chinquapin Run and Herring Run stream valleys. The Morgan Community Mile looks forward to returning to remove even more invasive plants.

Leave a comment

name*

email* (not published)

website